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, it's "meet the press." >>> wall of destruction, the death toll soars from japan's twin disasters as authorities race to head off nuclear meltdowns. >>> shock waves, the situation in japan raises fears over the safety of nuclear power plants here at home. >>> and whiteout, a late winter blizzard leaves hundreds of motorists stranded in north dakota. >>> good morning, those stories and more straight ahead, this is first look on msnbc. >>> and we begin this morning with a country in crisis, in japan this morning, rescuers are searching for signs of life beneath the rubble as the clock ticks in the wake of friday's epic disaster. japanese please say they've recovered another 1,000 bodies that washed ashore along the miyagi coast, rising a mounting death toll that is believed to be above 10,000, nbc's kristen dahlgren joins us from tokyo with more. >> reporter: there have been more than 300 aftershocks registered here there were new warnings today. and now growing concerns over the possibility of a nuclear accident. with heavy equipment, and bare hands, rescue workers continue the des
'lin sana'a. rick: the president addressing the japan crisis during a news conference. >> i want to be very clear, we do not expect harmful levels of radiation to reach the united states, whether iting the west coast, hawaii, alaska, or u.s. territories in the pacific. rick: officials in japan are calling it a race against time. we have video for you of water being dropped into the overheating reactors at the fukushima plant. this is something that has not proven successful in the past. japan is raising the severity of the situation from a 4 to a 5. the government is acknowledging that it was overwhelmed and continues to be overwhelmed by the situation. gavin blair is on the phone from japan. i understand you are traveling to sendai, which is one of the areas hardest hit by this catastrophy. >> reporter: we just popped through the u.s. exclusion zone or the japanese he can collusion zone. it has been reclassified up to a 5. the chopper missions to drop water has had minimal effect on cool the plant. they tried hosing the plant with fire engines. but apparently the fire truck hoses couldn't
'm bill hemmer. welcome back, alisyn. alisyn: i'mal lynn cam rata in for martha. >> northern japan was hit by a massive magnitude 9.0 earthquake. i feel deep in my heart as i see the conditions in the affected area. i'm concerned about the nuclear situation because it's unpredictable. with the help of those involved i hope things will not get worse. bill report emperor is in his as it and he's rarely seen on television. show you where we are right now. northeast of tokyo, 200 miles, the fukushima plant in an animation we put together to show you what's happening on the inside as it runs north to the south. you will see the four reactors at this plants in question. there were 6 reactors under consideration but for sake of this purpose we'll show you reactor number 1, 3, and 4. 1, 2, 3 were online when the quake and same rolled through. number 4 was offline. about it was rolling with spent nuclear fuel. then we can show you where we are today. that's what they looked like 7 days ago. on this map here, this was taken two days ago. the four reactors are on the screen. this is number 4, and num
. "first look" is up next. >>> desperate measures. the world watches and waits as japan tries to contain its nuclear crisis. survival instinct, incredible new video of heroic rescues during the craftic tsunami. and royal jewel, the see-through dress that caught a prince's eye sells for a whopping sum. good morning. i'm lynn berry. those stories and more on "first look" on msnbc. today, we begin with a race against the clock. japan is desperately trying to reconnect power to critical cooling systems at the fukushima power plant. this as smoke has once again been seen rising from the crippled nuclear facility. today high-capacity fire engines are blasting tons of water into the hot zone, an unexplained switch from yesterday's air attacks. >> reporter: tons of water, the difference between salvation and catastrophe at japan's stricken nuclear plant. >> the situation remains very serious. but there's been no significant worsening since yesterday. >> reporter: the cloud billowing from the fukushima daichi plant on wednesday was all but gone thursday, but the possibility of a meltdown is still
chief for criticizing japan officials. the u.n. says, we have to wait for more news. that's what we'll do. jon: so much confusion and it doesn't help anyone. thanks for joining us. jenna: "america live" starts right now. megyn: thanks, guys, this is a fox news alert. anger and frustration intensifying in japan's nuclear crisis right now. there are new reports that u.s. forces helping in relief efforts are being ordered to stay at least 50 miles away from the crippled fukushima plant. you are looking at up-close video of the reactors, where conditions took a turn for the worse. a big jump in radiation levels forced the teams to leave the plant and abandon efforts to cool down the reactors. experts say that radiation has traveled far beyond the 20-mile radius. the pentagon assuring that u.s. forces will have to stay away unless they have special authorization. we're getting reports that evacuation shelters are running out of food and basic necessities. many victims reportedly furious over the government's response. trace gallagher picks up the story from there. trace? >> reporter: the
in japan isรง "out o control." meantime, u.s. forces operating in that country are being moved even further away from the power plant for safety. a live report from tokyo straight ahead. plus police and protesters face off in pakistan just hours after reports that the u.s. paid more than $2 million for the release of a cia contractor accused of murder. new comments on the situation from the secretary of state. >>> and he reached out online to people he never met in person convincing them to kill themselves. now a judge says the minnesota man in this picture must go to jail. >> it's not fair. it's not fair. >>> a push to rally in michigan. protesters still at odds with the state's governor over the budget join forces at the state capital. the latest in the on going standoff between public union workers in this country and some republican lawmakers. >>> i'm tamron hall. "news nation" is following new details on the nuclear crisis in japan. the secretary-general of the international atomic energy association says he's headed to japan as soon as possible as workers at the fukushima plant strugg
potential setback as japan struggles to contain its nuclear reactor crisis. >>> and fallen star, fans mourn of sudden death of germany's most beloved zoo animal. >>> good morning, everyone, i'm lynn berry, those stories and more are straight afed, this is "first look" on msnbc. >>> we begin this morning with targeting libya. american and european militaries spent the weekend launching intense strikes on libya. in a mission aimed at halting moammar gadhafi's brutal attacks on anti-government rebels. although the american officials say u.s. is not trying to kill gadhafi, operation odyssey dawn appears to have hit close to home for the libyan leader. nbc news learned that english forces conductsed a strike on his compound. it's not known where gadhafi was at the time. but aordering to "the new york times," journalists bussed to the site didn't report casualties. >>> and u.s. defense secretary robert gates intends to hand over leadership of the coalition in a matter of days. for more on the operation, we go to nbc's brian moore. >> reporter: with a second day of fighter jet attacks and missile
on libya coming up at the top of the hour on "morning joe." >>> exactly one week after japan's quake and tsunami, a frantic effort is underway to stem the crisis at the fukushima nuclear plant. the complex's third unit is the main priority since water there is thought to be dangerously low. in a possible setback today, smoke rose from one of the buildings as crews worked to reconnect power to critical systems. the international atomic energy agency is reporting the severity rating of the nuclear crisis has been raised from 4 to 5, on a scale of 1 to 7, with 7 being the worst that would suggest a level of seriousness on par with the three mile accident in the united states in 1979. up to 64 tons of water was dropped in the overreheated reactors yesterday. and the agency says a cable has been restored to the cooling pumps at the second reactor in the plant. throughout the week the japanese government has been criticized about poor communication and the situation. for now the government says it has no plans to expand its mandatory 12-mile exclusion zone around the plant. for more on the
of intervention? >>> and disaster in japan. exhausted engineers struggle to get power restored at the country's crippled nuclear reactors. in the hopes of avoiding a meltdown. meanwhile, high levels of radiation begin to show up in food in japan, as the country's prime minister urges his people to show courage in the wake of their unspeakable tragedy. we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march we'll have those stories "early" this saturday morning, march 19th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> new york city waking up to a sunny saturday morning. the last saturday before spring begins. welcome to "the early show." i'm rebecca jarvis. >> and i'm russ mitchell. two major stories to get to this morning. we begin with libya. this morning libyan forces loyal to moammar gadhafi entered the outskirts of benghazi in eastern libya. opposition forces shot down a warplane that was bombing the city. the warfare continues as the libyan government denies its forces atacked benghazi and said it is observing a cease-fire. president obama warned mr. gadhafi must -- >> let me be clear. these
. also tonight, milk in the u.s. now showing traces of radiation from japan. what authorities are doing to keep you safe. why did plants that bury nuclear waste inside nevada's yucca mountain get killed? was it safety fears or politics? and the sweet taste of success. they owe their lottery jackpot to a candy bar. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> hill: good evening. katie is off tonight. muammar qaddafi's inner circle continues to shrink. first, his foreign minister defected last night. and then today, his u.n. ambassador quit while in egypt. just the same, qaddafi's military, though decimated by allied air strikes, is still pounding rebel forces. driving them further east away from key oil towns. one rebel leader compared qaddafi to a wounded animal, one that's more dangerous than a healthy one, which once again raises the question-- just what should the u.s. do moving forward? david martin begins our coverage. >> reporter: there may be no american troops on the ground, but c.i.a. officers are
america. >>> in japan, new problems at the country's crippled nuclear complex are overshadowing some success at cooling the plant's overheated reactors over the weekend. there had been some optimism. this morning, workers at the facility were evacuated after gray smoke rose from the spent storage pool at the plant's number three reactor. it development comes after officials said they had successfully restored water pumps to two other reactors, putting them under control in a state known as a cold shutdown. the crisis, far from over with the discovery of radiation-tainted vegetables and tap water adding to public fears about contaminated food and drink. all that as officials now predict the death toll there in japan will exceed 18,000 from the earthquake and tsunami that followed. the situation in japan has raised questions in the u.s. energy secretary steven chu weighed in on a controversial nuclear reactor in new york city. >> we'll have to look at weather the reactor should remain. again, i don't want to jump to some judgment about what we should do going forward. the nrc will be l
>>> tonight on "world news," the truth about american milk. a trace of radiation from japan turning up in the u.s. milk supply. exactly how much? is it completely safe? we take you inside the laboratory to see for yourself. >>> tornado fury. violent twisters tossing everything in their path, even striking the space center in florida. >>> mega-wow. seven overjoyed coworkers claim that $319 million prize. and we find one of the colleagues who opted out of the ticket that day. what did he say to us? >>> and, coming home. the marine who watched the birth of his first child from the battlefield with us finally gets to hold her tiny hand, right here, tonight. >>> good evening. we begin with america's milk, and that radiation from japan. all day, we have heard the reassurances that the radiation now being found in some of the u.s. milk supply is minimal and poses no risk. so, we spent this day answering some serious questions. since the radiation in some form has been found in 20 states, exactly how much has been linked to the milk and how the are experts sure that it is safe? abc's abbie
solid qaddafi's inner circle is now. >> hill: that damaged nuclear plant in japan is still leaking radiation tonight. water tested beneath the plant today showed radiation measuring 10,000 times the legal limit. and the levels in sea water have jumped again, now more than 4,000 times what's acceptable. for the first time, elevated radiation levels were found in meat. the meat came from a single cow near the fukushima plant. one vivid example of the fear all of this is causing, there you see a mother. she had her baby born just four days after the quake and tsunami screened for radiation contamination. in this country, many are also on heightened alert after traces of radioactive iodine were found in milk in california and washington state. the contamination is described as minuscule, posing no threat to the public. john blackstone shows us what's being done to make sure our food is safe. >> reporter: the amount of radioactive iodine measured in milk on the west coast was so small that it did not rise above the normal background level of radiation. still, it's the first evidence tha
evacuation wasn't accurate. after an error like that, can information from japan about the nuclear reactors be trusted? budget battle. at the beginning of the 112 congress, two freshmen from opposite sides of the aisle promise to work together but with another budget battle looming, can they do it? we talk to the two lawmakers again live. all of that, plus a scandal involving the new york city fire department. should the city be forced to pay money to those who couldn't pass the entrance exam? i'm breech breech and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now -- i'm shannon bream and america's news headquarters from the nation's capital starts right now. we begin in japan. the spike in radiation level that led to evacuation was just a mistake. we have the latest. >> reporter: it was a breach coming from the authorities this sunday and we heard an official say that the radiation in water at the plant went to 10 million levels, that would be a catastrophic meltdown scenario numbers. fortunately, it was nowhere near that. radiation levels in the water have spiked four
workers from japan's crippled nuclear power plant ended up in the in the hospital today. they sustained beta ray radiation burns to their legs. they're part of a three-man team working to restore cooling systems at reactor three. smoke could be seen rising from those reactors again. >>> japan's considering bringing in bottled water from overseas. panicked shoppers have cleaned out stores across tokyo after officials warned yesterday not to give tap water to infants. officials say radiation levels in tap water are now back to normal. >>> the u.s. ambassador to japan visited an evacuation center in miyagi prefecture, the hardest hit by the quake and tsunami. it's believed miyagi alone lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan has the latest now from the region. he's in seoul, south korea. lee, good day to you. >> reporter: hey, contessa. yeah, every day, as we've been talking about all week, the death toll seems to climb here. we're now up to nearly 9,700 people that are confirmed dead, nearly 17,000 missing. some 250,000 people remain homeless and another 300,000 are still living in shelte
ravaged nuclear plant in japan. earlier, workers at that site reported a massive spike in radioactive water in the cooling system. perhaps ten million times as higher than normal, but now plant operators conceding that extremely high reading was wrong. let's go to dominic streaming live from osaka, japan. >> reporter: gregg, they are having extreme problems with highly radioactive water at the four of six troubled reactors. this radioactive water has seeped into buildings around the reactors which is making the job more difficult. up until yesterday, which was sunday japan time for a monday morning, they were actually able to access certain parts and get close to the core as possible to. radioactive water spread to other parts. because workers can only go in for 15 minutes due to the health and safety levels it's making the job doubly difficult. they are not sure where the source has come from. is it the result of the water being sprayed in and actually diluted a lot of the other radioactive water? is it coming from somewhere? they don't know. until they can actually start to drain so
reactors at japan's krip crippled nuclear plant temperature. they say there is still a lot of work to be done before electricity can be turned on. emergency crews dumped 18 tons of seawater into a nearly boiling pool holding spent nuclear fuel. japan's nikkei market closed with more than a 4% gain today thanks to the good news at the power plant. the index is still 7% lower than its close the day the earthquake and tsunami hit. >>> crews recovered the body of taylor anderson, an american teaching english in miyagi, japan, believed to be the first american victim, the first known one of the quake and tsunami. they estimate miyagi prefecture lost 15,000 people. >>> nbc's lee cowan is live now in seoul, south of korea. what's the story now? what's the situation with fear and whether it is dissipating in that region? >> reporter: i think there is still a lot of fear, it depends on where you are. if you are talking in the north, you are still focused so much on the search and rescue effort. it is still officially search and rescue. they go through the rebel with sticks trying their best
of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way. how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyone who actually believes they have a chance of winning the republican nomination get heard if people like michele bauchmann, sarah palin, and donald trump suck up the oxygen. >>> we start with what's next on the libyan front. nbc chief foreign correspondent richard engel is in benghazi after a heralding couple of days. what happened today on the ground in libya that you've seen? >> reporter: tdaye went out of benghazi and instead of going to the rebel frontline about 100 miles south of here, we went to the frontline and then went around it. and we were able to get inside the city of ajd
morning, everybody. this is a shocking development out of japan. imagine how concerned you would be as a parent if there was radiation in the drinking water that was twice the recommended level for infants. >> that's what millions of parents in tokyo are dealing with this morning. levels of radioactive iodine were found at a treatment center. now parents are advised not to give it to infants. the latest in a live report from tokyo ahead. >> also ahead, richard engel has made his way to the rebel front lines in libya following a fourth straight night of coalition missile strikes. >> a lot of serious stories to talk about. but on a lighter note, have you seen this viral video. this is a 5-month-old boy who can't decide what to make of the sound of his mom blowing her nose. first he's laughing, then horrified. then bursts out laughing again. i think 8 million people have watched this online. we'll watch the little boy and his parents coming up. >> on a more serious note, the dangerousle levels of radiation in tokyo's drinking level. robert bazell joins us again this morning. hey, bo
? >>> japan's radiation fears. a run on water and basic supplies in tokyo and at the crippled nuclear plant, workers sent to the hospital from exposure to beta rays. >>> and washington, we have a problem. the strange case of two ssenger jets forc to lan on ei oat d.c. mor rpt when no one answered at air traffic control. we'll have the latest on the investigation, just ahead. >>> good morning, everyone. it's thursday, march 24th, 2011. i'm savannah guthrie. chuck todd will be back tomorrow. also this morning, the president getting it from the right and the left in congress on libya, as he wakes up this morning back in washington. and we will talk to the libyan ambassador to the u.s., who left the gadhafi regime live here on "the daily rundown" later this hour. >>> also, the slow start to the 2012 republican race seems to be helping one candidate -- president obama. we'll have the latest poll. >>> but let's get to the rundown. and we'll start in libya, where a more complicated and potentially more dangerous phase of the military effort has begun. coalition war planes are now attacking gadhafi
nuclear power plant in japan where workers still desperately trying to prevent more radiation from seeping into the atmosphere. today officials report three work rz were exposed to radioactivity. two were sent to the hospital for treatment. meanwhile, workers distributing bottled water across tokyo after residents there cleared store shelves following yesterday's warning the city's tap water contained elevated radiation. japanese government also estimates this month's earthquake and tsunami could cost up to $309 billion in damage, which would make it the world's most expensive natural disaster ever. >>> this a-s a wild story. the national transportation safety board is now reviewing staffing at airports across the country after two passenger planes landed at reagan national airport yesterday without clearance because, according to aviation officials the air traffic controller fell asleep at reagan national airport in washington, d.c. the planes were carrying a total of 165 passengers and crew between them did land safely but they had to do it on their own after pilots took matters into the
and sleeplessness. motrin pm. >>> black smoke is rising from reactor number 3, forcing workers to evacuate japan's fukushima nuclear plant today. officials haven't said what caused it or whether any radiation was released. the japanese have confirmed that radiation levels in tokyo's tap water is more than twice what's considered safe for babies. so word has gone out to the city's 13 million residents not to use tap water to make infant formula. >>> and more radiation concerns in food. the government has added broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage to the list of tainted vegetables consumers should avoid and the u.s. is the first to ban produce and dairy products from some parts of japan. >>> michi kaku is a city of new york professor of physics and author of "physics of the future." always good to see you. if obviously you gasp when you hear baby's formula can't be made with water. do you think it's a matter of time before children and adults are advised not to drink it? >> well the good news is radiation levels are still low and if there's no more radiation from the reactor in about a month radiatio
to people in places like japan and kwlab. between to switch gears and talk about the crisis in japan. tokyo's drinking water supply has spiked to radiation levels dangerous for infants. emergency workers were evacuated yet again. robert bazell is in tokyo with the details on this story. bob, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. you can see it is raining here in tokyo now. the fact is it has been raining like this for days. it has driven the radiation escaping from the plant into the ground and into the groundwater. as a result, main distribution station for water here in tokyo, they found radioactive iodide levels. you can imagine that's very concerning for a lot of parents. at the reactor itself as we pointed out, some signs of progress but the black smoke and other things are setbacks. this is a crisis that shows no sign of ending any time soon. at this water plan that serves the greater tokyo area, officials found levels of iodide twice as high it is a standard for infants. officials told parents to only give infants bottled water. yet again today black smoke rising from reactor numb
on the attac >>> setback. just hours after officials reporting progress at the nuclear plant in japan. smoke rising from the reactor forced them to evacuate again. this as japan halts shipments of milk and vegetables near the site over fears of contamination. >>> and a female wing walker fighting for her life after her husband was forced to crash land the airplane. he speaks about her condition today, monday march 21, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. busy monday morning. i'm matt lauer. ann curry is back from japan, in for meredith. what an extra job you did over that on what had to be a difficult trip. >> it was difficult for everyone involved. i think we are all thinking of the people that are still there and especially there japanese. we'll have the latest from japan including the latest evacuation of the workers from the nuclear power plant and also the detection of radiation on spinach and milk coming up, matt. >> also ahead the u.s. army is issuing an apology for disturbing photos that portray abuse allegedly
weapon systems, perhaps a quicker drawdown, why are we still in europe? and other overseas miss. japan we allow them to -- we provide their military shield. it's time for some of these other countries to grow up. >> peter, you have a very positive statement, and i agree, but in that same bill, i think it was and we got about 120 people to vote for it. we're still building bridges in afghanistan, but i agree with you. >> i was with you on that vote. i want to build infrastructure they're in the united states. >> i love this love coming out on this program. >> when we look at defense, it's historically been the republican party blocked anything in that direction. they said i can't believe the democrats would do that, attention, how do you get beyond that? look at what our president is doing. he had a very strong statement about our need to be involve in libya. he expanded the war in afghanistan. oy 'bama is getting close to the possible. i think it's bipartisan. it's a bipartisan mess, and i think that republicans a lot of republicans and democrats outside of washington still expect a lot f
're goin to oo mend right now we're kind of one to one. japan is two times the amount of debt compared to how much they make every year. is that how far we can go? >> i don't think we're going to get anywhere near that. and one way of thinking about this is, in terms of a company's balance sheet, on one side you have what you owe. the other side are your assets. if you were a company and you had a lot of good projects, okay, investments 20%, 30%, i'll lend you money at close to zero interest rate, you would be foolish not to do it. because it's exactly by investing that you're going to grow and become a big company. noup there's another point that i try to raise, in the article that i wrote, which is there are lots of ways we can get. we spend literally billions and billions on weapons that don't work. >> and their suggestion is that we should cut some of those back? >> and those don't improve the balance sheet. they create a liability. but they don't create an asset. we can have more security with less spending. >> all righty. of course there's the factors of political will behind all
of diana's dresses. take a look. the pink dress, the dress she wore to a state dinner in japan in 1986. this was a famous dinner. remember, he had the chopsticks upside down? >> i remember that. >> that could sell for as much as $80,000. another dress which spoke about evolution of the princess, that beautiful robe she wore to a state dinner. $100,000. the woman reunning the auction house said most of the interest comes from the u.s. a lot of the bidders are foreign. not britain. >> we have a guest book, a fascination on this side of the pond. >> we do. >> thanks, bianna. i want the hat. >>> let get more on this from our expert on all things, royal katie nicholl, the author of "the making of a royal romance." we could have news on the dress. "the sunday times" reported that the designer could be sarah burton, the creative director of alexander mcqueen. she's designed it. the palace is saying basically nothing. try and sort it out for us. >> the palace are going to be very noncommittal. they made it clear right from the start when i planned that first conference, that nothing would come
. people are using boats instead of their cars to get around. a powerful off-shore earthquake rattles japan causing buildings and bridges to sway. this video shows the exact moment. 7.2 magnitude quake hits the city. it's 250 miles north of tokyo. there are no reports of injuries or any serious damage. president obama's top national security advisors are meeting today to consider plans to get libyan leader mow mouammar qaddo step down finally. hillary clinton and leon panetta will be at the meeting. the president is not expected to attend. qaddafi was on television overnight saying the west is only after his country's oil and says the libyans tried to oust him while they're being drugged by al-qaida. the crew of space shuttle discovery woke up to gwyneth paltrow this morning? >> there she is. >> she was singing the oscar nominated song "coming home" for the film "country song." the cargo bay doors will be closed shortly after 8:00 with the re-entry burn scheduled for 10:52 this morning. shuttle scheduled to land at kennedy space center in cape canaveral at 11:57 a.m. i like how that red ar
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)